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Last Updated: March 08, 2011
Jordanian Ikhwan Set to Become Lead Players among Jordanian Lawmakers
By Our Staff Writer

New Delhi, March 8 With its Friday anti-government rallies in Jordan attracting more protesters each week, the Jordanian Ikhwanul Muslemeen has too positioned itself to become a leading player among Jordanian lawmakers if democratic reforms were enacted.

It is to point out that Hamza Mansour, the head of the political wing of the Jordanian Ikhwan, has on February 3, 2011 rejected an offer from the newly appointed Prime Minister Marouf al-Bakhit to join his Cabinet.

According to the international news agencies, the Islamic Action Front (IAF), the political wing of the Jordanian Ikhwanul Muslemeen, was the country’s only established Opposition party, and analysts estimated that it could win up to 25 percent of parliamentary seats if electoral reforms were carried out. Ikhwan’s domestic agenda contained uncontroversial goals such as fighting corruption and poverty.

Jordan’s King Abdullah II, in an image made available by the Jordanian Royal Court, waved to crowds who thronged the streets of Mazar Shamali, 80 miles north of Amman, to greet the monarch on March 1. The king appeared to be almost universally popular in Jordan.

Jordanians faced widespread poverty and almost 14 percent unemployment. Taxes ranged from 16 percent on medicines to as much as 40 percent on gas. In the heart of the Middle East , Jordanians complained that they paid more at the pump than Americans.

Meanwhile, salaries have stagnated as prices rose. Average working people were earning about $350 a month in the capital, Amman , largely considered to be the most expensive city in the Middle East .

 


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